4 common mistakes that tank responsive mobile conversion

About 10 years ago, just two screen sizes accounted for 77% of all web usage. Fast-forward to today, and things are very different, with laptops, tablets, smartphones, netbooks and web-enabled TVs among the devices that can access the internet. Responsive web design is the answer to staying competitive in our many-screened landscape – but it isn’t a silver bullet. Here are 4 things that can kill your conversion rates even with a responsive website.

How to move from m-dot URLs to responsive site

With more sites moving towards responsive web design, many webmasters have questions about migrating from separate mobile URLs, also frequently known as “m-dot URLs”, to using responsive web design. Here are some recommendations on how to move from separate urls to one responsive URL in a way that gives your sites the best chance of performing well on Google’s search results.

Moving to responsive sites in a Googlebot-friendly way

Once you have your responsive site ready, moving is something you can definitely do with just a bit of forethought. Considering your URLs stay the same for desktop version, all you have to do is to configure 301 redirects from the mobile URLs to the responsive web URLs.

Here are the detailed steps:

  1. Get your responsive site ready
  2. Configure 301 redirects on the old mobile URLs to point to the responsive versions (the new pages). These redirects need to be done on a per-URL basis, individually from each mobile URLs to the responsive URLs.
  3. Remove any mobile-URL specific configuration your site might have, such as conditional redirects or a vary HTTP header.
  4. As a good practice, setup rel=canonical on the responsive URLs pointing to themselves (self-referential canonicals).

If you’re currently using dynamic serving and want to move to responsive design, you don’t need to add or change any redirects.

Some benefits for moving to responsive web design

Moving to a responsive site should make maintenance and reporting much easier for you down the road. Aside from no longer needing to manage separate URLs for all pages, it will also make it much easier to adopt practices and technologies such as hreflang for internationalization, AMP for speed, structured data for advanced search features and more.

As always, if you need more help you can ask a question in our webmaster forum.

Posted by Cherry Prommawin, Webmaster Relations

How to move from m-dot URLs to responsive site

With more sites moving towards responsive web design, many webmasters have questions about migrating from separate mobile URLs, also frequently known as “m-dot URLs”, to using responsive web design. Here are some recommendations on how to move from separate urls to one responsive URL in a way that gives your sites the best chance of performing well on Google’s search results.

Moving to responsive sites in a Googlebot-friendly way

Once you have your responsive site ready, moving is something you can definitely do with just a bit of forethought. Considering your URLs stay the same for desktop version, all you have to do is to configure 301 redirects from the mobile URLs to the responsive web URLs.

Here are the detailed steps:

  1. Get your responsive site ready
  2. Configure 301 redirects on the old mobile URLs to point to the responsive versions (the new pages). These redirects need to be done on a per-URL basis, individually from each mobile URLs to the responsive URLs.
  3. Remove any mobile-URL specific configuration your site might have, such as conditional redirects or a vary HTTP header.
  4. As a good practice, setup rel=canonical on the responsive URLs pointing to themselves (self-referential canonicals).

If you’re currently using dynamic serving and want to move to responsive design, you don’t need to add or change any redirects.

Some benefits for moving to responsive web design

Moving to a responsive site should make maintenance and reporting much easier for you down the road. Aside from no longer needing to manage separate URLs for all pages, it will also make it much easier to adopt practices and technologies such as hreflang for internationalization, AMP for speed, structured data for advanced search features and more.

As always, if you need more help you can ask a question in our webmaster forum.

Posted by Cherry Prommawin, Webmaster Relations

What is Google Stamp and what will it mean for marketers?

Google is set to launch a competitor to Snapchat Discover, known as Google Stamp. This new product will bring with it a host of opportunities for publishers and advertisers alike, but it brings with it some challenges too. What do marketers need to know about this new service – and how successful might it be?

How to optimize VR content for search

Virtual reality (VR) has been the talk of the town for a little while now and its marketing potential is getting difficult to ignore. But despite the clear benefits of VR, businesses are still hesitant about diving in. Can VR content be found using search engines? Is it even possible to optimize virtual reality content for search? We take a look at how to do VR SEO.

How to optimize featured snippets for voice search

When it comes to voice search, featured snippets are key. If a searcher is using voice search and expecting a verbal reply, they will not be presented with a choice of results – and where a featured snippet is present, this will be the result read out. So how can you optimize your featured snippets for voice search?

Why SEOs can’t afford to wait around for a mobile-first index

SEO and performance marketing agency BrightEdge today released a new report which sheds light on the steadily widening gap between mobile and desktop search. I spoke to Erik Newton, VP of Customer Marketing and Head of SEO at BrightEdge, about the report’s findings, Google’s mobile-first index tests, and how SEOs can adapt their strategy.