Learning more about clinical depression with the PHQ-9 questionnaire

Editor’s note:

Now when you search for “clinical depression” on Google on mobile, you’ll see a Knowledge Panel that will give you the option to tap “check if you’re clinically depressed”, which will bring you to PHQ-9, a clinically validated screening questionnaire to test what your likely level of depression may be. To ensure that the information shared in the PHQ-9 questionnaire is accurate and useful, we have partnered with the National Alliance on Mental Illness on this announcement. Please see a guest post from them below.

Clinical depression is a very common condition—in fact, approximately one in five Americans experience an episode in their lifetime. However, despite its prevalence, only about 50 percent of people who suffer from depression actually receive treatment. To help raise awareness of this condition, we’ve teamed up with Google to help provide more direct access to tools and information to people who may be suffering.

You may have noticed that in Google search results, when you search for depression or clinical depression in the U.S., you see a Knowledge Panel for the condition which provides general information about it, the symptoms, and possible treatment options. Today PHQ-9, a clinically validated screening questionnaire which can help identify levels of depressive symptoms is also available directly from the search result. By tapping “Check if you’re clinically depressed,” you can take this private self-assessment to help determine your level of depression and the need for an in-person evaluation. The results of the PHQ-9 can help you have a more informed conversation with your doctor.

Mental health professionals often refer to major depressive disorder as clinically significant depression or clinical depression. Clinical depression is a treatable condition which can impact many aspects of  a person’s life. The PHQ-9 can be the first step to getting a proper diagnosis.

Statistics show that those who have symptoms of depression experience an average of a 6-8 year delay in getting treatment after the onset of symptoms. We believe that awareness of depression can help empower and educate you, enabling quicker access to treatment. And while this tool can help, it’s important to note that PHQ-9 is not meant to act as a singular tool for diagnosis.

We hope that by making this information available on Google, more people will become aware of depression and seek treatment to recover and improve their quality of life.

For more information about depression, you can explore our website.

Chin up, the Great American Eclipse is today!

For the first time in 99 years, today people across the continental US will be able to see a total solar eclipse. The eclipse will be partially visible across a large swath of the United States, while those in the 70 mile wide “path of totality” stretching from Oregon to South Carolina will be able to see the moon completely cover the sun. Whether it’s been on your calendar for years or you’ve been in the dark until now…we hope our special content (and tips!) give you a sliver of insight.

Today’s Great American Eclipse Doodle introduces you to some very playful alien creatures who seem to be having quite a bit of fun today. Doodle artist Gerben Steenks considered many ideas—from anthropomorphic cameras to nocturnal bats and owls—to introduce our eclipse event to users. But he finally settled on an astronomy-loving space traveler who delights in guiding Earthlings in their understanding of stellar events.

To learn more about solar eclipse science, click through the Doodle to Google Search and get some fun facts courtesy of our out-of-this-world friends. You can learn about a crowd-sourced photo project to capture images of the eclipse as it traverses North America, and even follow NASA’s livestreaming video of the event — which, if you don’t have eclipse glasses or a pinhole camera, is a good way to watch the magic and avoid damaging your eyes.

Before, during, and after the eclipse, NASA will be sharing information with posts right in Search results. So if your neck is tired staring up at the sky, just tilt it back down, take off your eclipse glasses, and pull out your phone for some updates.

Now in the words of Bonnie Tyler, “turnaround, bright eyes”…it’s time!

Chin up, the Great American Eclipse is today!

For the first time in 99 years, today people across the continental US will be able to see a total solar eclipse. The eclipse will be partially visible across a large swath of the United States, while those in the 70 mile wide “path of totality” stretching from Oregon to South Carolina will be able to see the moon completely cover the sun. Whether it’s been on your calendar for years or you’ve been in the dark until now…we hope our special content (and tips!) give you a sliver of insight.

doodle

Today’s Great American Eclipse Doodle introduces you to some very playful alien creatures who seem to be having quite a bit of fun today. Doodle artist Gerben Steenks considered many ideas—from anthropomorphic cameras to nocturnal bats and owls—to introduce our eclipse event to users. But he finally settled on an astronomy-loving space traveler who delights in guiding Earthlings in their understanding of stellar events.

fun facts

To learn more about solar eclipse science, click through the Doodle to Google Search and get some fun facts courtesy of our out-of-this-world friends. You can learn about a crowd-sourced photo project to capture images of the eclipse as it traverses North America, and even follow NASA’s livestreaming video of the event — which, if you don’t have eclipse glasses or a pinhole camera, is a good way to watch the magic and avoid damaging your eyes.

Before, during, and after the eclipse, NASA will be sharing information with posts right in Search results. So if your neck is tired staring up at the sky, just tilt it back down, take off your eclipse glasses, and pull out your phone for some updates.

Now in the words of Bonnie Tyler, “turnaround, bright eyes”…it’s time!

Video previews help you find what you’re looking for even faster

We’re always looking for ways to help you find information faster and easier. That’s why when you look up “NBA draft recap,” for example, you’ve always seen short text snippets for each result. These text snippets help give you a snapshot of the site’s content, making it easier to decide whether you’d like to click through to read more. For videos, we have traditionally shown a static image thumbnail in search results. But as more information moves to video, we’re working on new ways to give you useful glimpses, helping you quickly find what you’re looking for across video, too.

Starting today and rolling out more widely next week, on the Google app for Android and Chrome on Android, when video results show up in the video carousel, just like text snippets for text results, you’ll see video previews. So whether you’re trying to learn some new salsa dance steps or you’re stuck on the side of the road trying to change a flat tire, and need a video that uses the tools you have on hand, you now have access to video previews directly in search results, giving you a better idea of what you’re about to watch before you tap.

By default, previews only play when you’re on a wi-fi connection. To enable previews on mobile networks or to opt out of this feature, visit the settings menu within the Google app or settings for Android Chrome.

A few months back, we introduced video versions of Featured Snippets for quick answers to queries like “how to kickflip”. Video previews is the next step in helping you find information faster. More to come — but for now, Search on!

Video previews help you find what you’re looking for even faster

We’re always looking for ways to help you find information faster and easier. That’s why when you look up “NBA draft recap,” for example, you’ve always seen short text snippets for each result. These text snippets help give you a snapshot of the site’s content, making it easier to decide whether you’d like to click through to read more. For videos, we have traditionally shown a static image thumbnail in search results. But as more information moves to video, we’re working on new ways to give you useful glimpses, helping you quickly find what you’re looking for across video, too.

Starting today and rolling out more widely next week, on the Google app for Android and Chrome on Android, when video results show up in the video carousel, just like text snippets for text results, you’ll see video previews. So whether you’re trying to learn some new salsa dance steps or you’re stuck on the side of the road trying to change a flat tire, and need a video that uses the tools you have on hand, you now have access to video previews directly in search results, giving you a better idea of what you’re about to watch before you tap.

video

By default, previews only play when you’re on a wi-fi connection. To enable previews on mobile networks or to opt out of this feature, visit the settings menu within the Google app or settings for Android Chrome.

A few months back, we introduced video versions of Featured Snippets for quick answers to queries like “how to kickflip”. Video previews is the next step in helping you find information faster. More to come — but for now, Search on!

Video previews help you find what you’re looking for even faster

We’re always looking for ways to help you find information faster and easier. That’s why when you look up “NBA draft recap,” for example, you’ve always seen short text snippets for each result. These text snippets help give you a snapshot of the site’s content, making it easier to decide whether you’d like to click through to read more. For videos, we have traditionally shown a static image thumbnail in search results. But as more information moves to video, we’re working on new ways to give you useful glimpses, helping you quickly find what you’re looking for across video, too.

Starting today and rolling out more widely next week, on the Google app for Android and Chrome on Android, when video results show up in the video carousel, just like text snippets for text results, you’ll see video previews. So whether you’re trying to learn some new salsa dance steps or you’re stuck on the side of the road trying to change a flat tire, and need a video that uses the tools you have on hand, you now have access to video previews directly in search results, giving you a better idea of what you’re about to watch before you tap.

By default, previews only play when you’re on a wi-fi connection. To enable previews on mobile networks or to opt out of this feature, visit the settings menu within the Google app or settings for Android Chrome.

A few months back, we introduced video versions of Featured Snippets for quick answers to queries like “how to kickflip”. Video previews is the next step in helping you find information faster. More to come — but for now, Search on!

Turn around, bright eyes… and experience the total solar eclipse with Google

Move over, blue moon—there’s a more rare astronomical event in town. For the first time since 1979, a total eclipse of the sun is coming to the continental United States this Monday, August 21. Starting on the west coast around 9 a.m., the moon will begin to block the face of the sun. Not long later, the moon will completely cover the sun, leaving only the bright corona visible for as long as two minutes and 40 seconds.

Whether you’re traveling to see the “totality,” catching a glimpse of the partial eclipse from another location, or simply curious, Google can help you learn more about this unique moment. Grab your solar glasses and peep what we’ve got in store:

Live from the solar eclipse

Even if you’re not in the path of the solar eclipse you can tune to YouTube to watch the magic unfold live as it crosses over the U.S. Catch livestreams from NASA, The Weather Channel, Exploratorium, Discovery’s Science Channel, and Univision.

Sun, moon and Google Earth

With a new Voyager story in Google Earth, you can learn more about the science behind the eclipse. You can also see what it will look like where you live.

Futures made of virtual totality

If you’re not in 70 mile wide path of totality, fret not. Travel to Mt. Jefferson, OR in Google Earth VR (on Rift and Vive) and view it in virtual reality. From the menu, select Total Solar Eclipse to get a view from the center of the action.

Lights, camera, astronomical action

We’re working with UC Berkeley, other partners and volunteer photographers to capture images of the sun’s corona at the moment of totality for use in scientific research. We’re also using our technology to algorithmically align these images into the Eclipse Megamovie, a continuous view of the eclipse. Read about some of the people involved in this project, and stay tuned for the complete Megamovie soon after the eclipse on https://eclipsemega.movie.

It’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s Android O!

People worldwide have explained solar eclipses through the lens of myth and legend for centuries. This year, there’s a new supernatural being whose identity will be revealed as the sun and the moon do their celestial dance. Get ready to meet Android O at android.com/o.

While a solar eclipse is a pretty rare astrological event, don’t worry it’s not too early to start planning for the next one passing over the United States on October 14, 2023. You can always set a Google Calendar reminder to make sure you don’t forget.

Turn around, bright eyes… and experience the total solar eclipse with Google

Move over, blue moon—there’s a more rare astronomical event in town. For the first time since 1979, a total eclipse of the sun is coming to the continental United States this Monday, August 21. Starting on the west coast around 9 a.m., the moon will begin to block the face of the sun. Not long later, the moon will completely cover the sun, leaving only the bright corona visible for as long as two minutes and 40 seconds.

Whether you’re traveling to see the “totality,” catching a glimpse of the partial eclipse from another location, or simply curious, Google can help you learn more about this unique moment. Grab your solar glasses and peep what we’ve got in store:

Live from the solar eclipse

Even if you’re not in the path of the solar eclipse you can tune to YouTube to watch the magic unfold live as it crosses over the U.S. Catch livestreams from NASA, The Weather Channel, Exploratorium, Discovery’s Science Channel, and Univision.

Sun, moon and Google Earth

With a new Voyager story in Google Earth, you can learn more about the science behind the eclipse. You can also see what it will look like where you live.

Futures made of virtual totality

If you’re not in 70 mile wide path of totality, fret not. Travel to Mt. Jefferson, OR in Google Earth VR (on Rift and Vive) and view it in virtual reality. From the menu, select Total Solar Eclipse to get a view from the center of the action.

Lights, camera, astronomical action

We’re working with UC Berkeley, other partners and volunteer photographers to capture images of the sun’s corona at the moment of totality for use in scientific research. We’re also using our technology to algorithmically align these images into the Eclipse Megamovie, a continuous view of the eclipse. Read about some of the people involved in this project, and stay tuned for the complete Megamovie soon after the eclipse on https://eclipsemega.movie.

It’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s Android O!

People worldwide have explained solar eclipses through the lens of myth and legend for centuries. This year, there’s a new supernatural being whose identity will be revealed as the sun and the moon do their celestial dance. Get ready to meet Android O at android.com/o.

While a solar eclipse is a pretty rare astronomical event, don’t worry it’s not too early to start planning for the next one passing over the United States on October 14, 2023. You can always set a Google Calendar reminder to make sure you don’t forget.

Turn around, bright eyes… and experience the total solar eclipse with Google

Move over, blue moon—there’s a more rare astronomical event in town. For the first time since 1979, a total eclipse of the sun is coming to the continental United States this Monday, August 21. Starting on the west coast around 9 a.m., the moon will begin to block the face of the sun. Not long later, the moon will completely cover the sun, leaving only the bright corona visible for as long as two minutes and 40 seconds.

Whether you’re traveling to see the “totality,” catching a glimpse of the partial eclipse from another location, or simply curious, Google can help you learn more about this unique moment. Grab your solar glasses and peep what we’ve got in store:

Live from the solar eclipse

Even if you’re not in the path of the solar eclipse you can tune to YouTube to watch the magic unfold live as it crosses over the U.S. Catch livestreams from NASA, The Weather Channel, Exploratorium, Discovery’s Science Channel, and Univision.

Sun, moon and Google Earth

With a new Voyager story in Google Earth, you can learn more about the science behind the eclipse. You can also see what it will look like where you live.

Futures made of virtual totality

If you’re not in 70 mile wide path of totality, fret not. Travel to Mt. Jefferson, OR in Google Earth VR (on Rift and Vive) and view it in virtual reality. From the menu, select Total Solar Eclipse to get a view from the center of the action.

Lights, camera, astronomical action

We’re working with UC Berkeley, other partners and volunteer photographers to capture images of the sun’s corona at the moment of totality for use in scientific research. We’re also using our technology to algorithmically align these images into the Eclipse Megamovie, a continuous view of the eclipse. Read about some of the people involved in this project, and stay tuned for the complete Megamovie soon after the eclipse on https://eclipsemega.movie.

It’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s Android O!

People worldwide have explained solar eclipses through the lens of myth and legend for centuries. This year, there’s a new supernatural being whose identity will be revealed as the sun and the moon do their celestial dance. Get ready to meet Android O at android.com/o.

While a solar eclipse is a pretty rare astronomical event, don’t worry it’s not too early to start planning for the next one passing over the United States on October 14, 2023. You can always set a Google Calendar reminder to make sure you don’t forget.

All your questions answered on Google Maps and Search

When deciding where to go and what to do, we often ask ourselves lots of questions before making a decision. Soon, you’ll be able to ask those questions, get the answers you need, and even answer other people’s questions about places on Google Maps for Android and mobile Search.

To ask or answer a question—or read the existing questions and answers about a place—simply search for the location on Google Maps or Search and open the local business listing. Then scroll down to the “Question & answers” section where you can add a question, answer someone else’s question, or upvote informative ones by tapping the thumbs up icon. Upvoted questions and answers will appear toward the top of the section so that the most helpful content is most accessible.

Q&Agif

To make sure “Questions & answers” contains the most accurate and useful local info possible, business owners can add frequently asked questions and answers as well. In addition, when you ask a question about a place, we notify the business owner and other in-the-know users to see if they have knowledgeable answers to contribute. When your question is answered, we notify you too.

No matter where you’re headed or what you’re looking to do, Google Maps and Search highlights the information you need to make quick decisions and discover the world around you.

*This feature is rolling out to Google Maps and mobile Search users worldwide.